100 Years Ago

C.V. Seastone of Mead & Seastone, the engineers employed by the hydro-electric commission to make the preliminary surveys and reports upon hydro-electric development of the Missouri River, has been here in charge of a force of engineers for the past ten days. They have made several sections of the river and measured the discharge and find at the present stage about thirty-three thousand cubic feet of water pass under the Pierre bridge every second. They are making preliminary borings at Medicine Butte site, five miles above the city, and are finding satisfactory conditions. Monday, Mr. Seastone went to Little Bend to examine that locality. They are finding the contour and the topographical maps made by the Missouri River Commission of important assistance, saving much expense at this time. They will go over the entire river and by a system of eliminations determine which site complies with the statutory requirements for the place where the most power can be developed for the least money and where the current generated may be transmitted to every part of the state most conveniently and inexpensively and where the structure will be most useful for bridge purposes.

50 Years Ago

A free outdoor barbecue in downtown Pierre on Saturday August 9, will be one of the major attractions of the Oahe Days Celebration according to Vern Schutzle of the sponsoring Pierre Jaycees. The free barbecue will be held from 11 unit 1:30 p.m. at the south end of Pierre street near the Legion Cabin. Schutzle said the free barbecue was made possible thru cash donations from Pat Feened and Les Ferley. Other events highlighting the Oahe Days Celebration include the Miss Oahe Beauty Pageant Phi Chapter, the Demolition Derby sponsored by the Retail Committee of the Pierre Chamber of Commerce and a special teen dance featuring world famous recording artists, “The People,” sponsored by KCCR. The three-day long Oahe Days Celebration will kick off with an Oahe Days parade the morning of August 8 and conclude with championship stock car races on August 10. Oahe Days chairman Tom Gleason reminded those wishing to enter a float in the Oahe Days parade, to contact Jim Roberts at the Tradehome Shoe Store in downtown Pierre for information.

25 Years Ago

In the past three months, a quiet corner of the State Capitol lawn has drawn a steady stream of visitors from around the block and around the world. They come to gaze at a bronze statue of fighting horses and the granite slabs that form a memorial to the late Governor George Mickelson and seven other men who died in an April 19, 1993 plane crash. Form 6 a.m. until midnight, the memorial site is rarely unattended says John Moisan, a state official who directed the construction of the project. Visitors frequently show up even in the middle of the night, he says. “It’s absolutely a vigil. I’m absolutely amazed at it,” Moisan said. The memorial was dedicated three months ago on the first anniversary of the fatal plane crash that killed the eight men. The bronze statue, a replica of Korczak Ziolkowski’s sculpture, “Fighting Stallions,” depicts slightly larger than life-size fighting horses reared on their legs. It stands on top of a memorial that features eight granite stones, each weighing 10.3 tons and each bearing a likeness of one of the men. Some local residents include the memorial on their daily routes as they walk or jog. Tourists from afar stop to see it, even though it’s not advertised. Small granite stones spread around the base of the memorial keep disappearing because many visitors want to take a part of the monument home with them, he says. The Legislature provided $250,000 for the project, but Moisan estimates that individuals and businesses donated about $145,000 in materials and services.

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